Installing MySQL Server

This article series discusses installing MySQL and getting it running with some basic configuration.


Configuring MySQL server on Arch

We continue our MySQL server setup for Arch by looking at configuration options to try and ensure the server doesn’t just run, but runs smoothly.


Installing MySQL Server on Arch

We look at installing MySQL on Arch and getting it running with a database and a user to access it.


Configuring MySQL server on Gentoo

We continue our MySQL server setup for Gentoo by looking at configuration options to try and ensure the server doesn’t just run, but runs smoothly.


Installing MySQL Server on Gentoo

We look at installing MySQL on Gentoo and getting it running with a database and a user to access it.


Configuring MySQL server on RHEL

We continue our MySQL server setup for CentOS by looking at configuration options to try and ensure the server doesn’t just run, but runs smoothly.


Installing MySQL Server on RHEL

We look at installing MySQL on RHEL and getting it running with a database and a user to access it.


Configuring MySQL server on Fedora

We continue our MySQL server setup for Fedora by looking at configuration options to try and ensure the server doesn’t just run, but runs smoothly.


Installing MySQL Server on Fedora

We look at installing MySQL on Fedora and getting it running with a database and a user to access it.


Configuring MySQL server on CentOS

We continue our MySQL server setup for CentOS by looking at configuration options to try and ensure the server doesn’t just run, but runs smoothly.


Installing MySQL Server on CentOS

We look at installing MySQL on CentOS and getting it running with a database and a user to access it.


Configuring MySQL server on Debian

We continue our MySQL server setup for Debian by looking at configuration options to try and ensure the server doesn’t just run, but runs smoothly.

Installing MySQL Server on Debian

We look at installing MySQL on Debian and getting it running with a database and a user to access it.

Basic MySQL server tasks

Even the most basic MySQL server installation for Linux will have you performing basic administrative tasks like creating users and granting permissions. We look at some of those tasks here.

Configuring MySQL server on Ubuntu

We continue our MySQL server setup for Ubuntu by looking at configuration options to try and ensure the server doesn’t just run, but runs smoothly.

Installing MySQL Server on Ubuntu

We look at installing MySQL on Ubuntu and getting it running with a database and a user to access it.

Debian Lenny - Installing MySQL (with Rails and PHP options)

We've already covered how to install MySQL on Debian Lenny, but now we need to prepare our Rails or PHP installations to make use of it.

In this article we will look at what other packages are needed for MySQL to integrate with Ruby on Rails and with a standard PHP install.


CentOS - Installing MySQL (with Rails and PHP options)

Installing MySQL on CentOS is very simple using the 'yum' package manager.

This article will go through the install process and also look at what other packages are needed for MySQL to integrate with Ruby on Rails and with a standard PHP install.


Debian Lenny - Installing MySQL

Installing MySQL on Debian Lenny is very simple using the 'aptitude' package manager.

This article will go through the install process and you will have a database server up and running in no time.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Installing MySQL (with Rails and PHP options)

Installing MySQL on Ubuntu Intrepid is very simple using the 'aptitude' package manager.

This article will go through the install process and also look at what other packages are need for MySQL to integrate with Ruby on Rails and with a standard PHP install.


Mail server - adding domains and users to MySQL

Following from the previous article, we now have our firewall opening the correct ports.

Now we can start adding domains and users to the MySQL 'mail' database.


Mail server - secure connection, configuring Saslauthd

Following from the previous article we can begin creating creating the means to use secure connections with our mail server. We do this by using saslauthd.


Mail server - Configuring Postfix to use MySQL - part 2

Now we have created the external files Postfix will use when connecting to the 'mail' database (see the previous article for details), we can carry on and edit the main Postfix configuration file.


Mail server - Postfix and MySQL installation

Now we've configured the base Slice details and added the vmail user, we are ready to install Postfix and MySQL.

Remember, we will be using MySQL to control the domains and user details for our mail server.


Mail server - creating the MySQL database

Now we have Postfix and MySQL installed (see the previous article), we need to create the database to hold the domain and user details.


Mail server - Configuring Postfix to use MySQL - part 1

Now the MySQL database has been created, we need to move into configuring Postfix to access and use the details.


MySQL - exporting and importing databases

Once a database has been created it can be very useful to be able to export the data and then import it on another Slice or server.

This procedure is very simple and can greatly ease any migration of data.


MySQL - creating and editing columns and records

Previously, we looked at creating and editing tables in the 'mytestdb' database.

Now we can look at creating new columns and adding records. Basically, we can start using the database and tables.


MySQL - create and delete tables

In the previous article we created a database named 'mytestdb'.

Often that, and adding a user, is all we need to do as many frameworks (such as Ruby on Rails) take care of creating tables for us. However, we don't all use Ruby on Rails and adding tables is a useful skill to know. It's also not difficult.


MySQL - different levels of permissions

Following from the MySQL creating and editing users article, we can have a look at what permissions we can set and what each level means and what it allows the user to do.


MySQL - creating and editing users

Creating users for MySQL runs along the same lines as adding users on the Slice itself - you create a user with a password and assign permissions to different databases as needed.

As with the other MySQL commands, you will see it is actually quite easy to do this from the command line.


MySQL - create and delete databases

Continuing with administering MySQL from the command line, we can now look at creating and deleting databases within MySQL.

Often, this is one of two sets of commands that are needed (the other being creating users) as many modern frameworks (such as Ruby on Rails) create the tables, etc for you.


MySQL - show installed databases

The next few articles are aimed at showing the basics terminal commands for controlling and investigating MySQL.

This article starts at the beginning (always a good start point) and explains how to list the MySQL databases.


MySQL - reset a lost MySQL root password

The MySQL root password allows full access to the MySQL database and allows for all actions to be undertaken including creating new users, new databases, setting access rules and so on.

Losing one can be a difficult issue to encounter. Luckily, resetting the root password is easy as long as you have sudo access to the Slice.


Ubuntu Hardy - Installing MySQL (with Rails and PHP options)

Installing MySQL on Ubuntu Hardy is very simple using the 'aptitude' package manager.

This article will go through the install process and also look at what other packages are need for MySQL to integrate with Ruby on Rails and with a standard PHP install.


Ubuntu Gutsy - MySQL and RoR

In the Ubuntu Gutsy setup articles (page 1 and page 2) we secured, updated and personalised the install ready to add some working software.

As such, we can now install MySQL and Ruby on Rails with subversion and Postfix support.


Ubuntu Feisty - MySQL and RoR

In the previous Ubuntu Feisty articles (page 1 and page 2) we secured, updated and personalised the install ready to add some working software.

As such, we can now install MySQL and Ruby on Rails with subversion and Postfix support.


Debian Etch - MySQL and RoR

Previously we secured, updated and personalised our Debian Etch install ready for some action (see Debian Etch page 1 and page 2) .

Now we can install MySQL and Ruby on Rails with subversion and Postfix support.


Ubuntu LTS - MySQL and RoR

In the previous Ubuntu LTS setup articles page 1 and page 2 we secured, updated and personalised the install ready for some action.

Now we can install MySQL and Ruby on Rails with subversion and postfix support.