Install Nagios3 on Debian 5.0 Lenny

We show how to configure nginx on a 32-bit slice to serve dynamically-created content. Along the way, we show off a couple of troubleshooting techniques and how to work around the lack of a pre-compiled fastcgi package for Debian 5.0 Lenny.


Scheduling awstats report generation

We've looked at running awstats reports, but only manually. Let's automate report generation so all you need to worry about is looking at those sweet, sweet numbers.


Generating and viewing awstats reports

Now that awstats is installed we take a look at actually running the analysis and viewing the reports.


Installing awstats on Linux

The awstats program is a versatile tool for generating web traffic reports. We'll walk through a simple installation to track stats for your site.


Customizing nginx web logs

You can create your own custom formats for nginx web logs, to record more information or to make them easier to read. Here's how.


Interpreting common status codes in web logs

The status codes you find in your web logs are useful troubleshooting tools, but only if you know what they mean.


Reading nginx web logs

Whether you're dealing with web server difficulties or just want to see what nginx is up to, your best bet is to look in its logs.


Gentoo - Installing Nginx

Nginx is a lightweight web server, popular with those who don't need the extra services that Apache offers and are looking for less bulky alternatives.

This article will look at installing Nginx on a Gentoo slice.


Debian Lenny - Nginx Virtual Hosts #2

The previous Debian Lenny Nginx Virtual Hosts article introduced the basics of the setting up virtual hosts.

This allowed us to serve multiple domains from a single IP address and Slice. Now we can look in detail at more of the settings available to us in the Virtual Host files.


Debian Lenny - Nginx Virtual Hosts #1

Now we have Nginx installed (whether via the package manager or from source) and are in a position to serve multiple domains using Virtual Hosts.

Do note the layout used in this article is explained here — feel free to use the directories of your choice.


Debian Lenny - Nginx configuration

Whether you have installed Nginx using the package manager or from source, you will need to look at the main configuration file and see what may need changing and optimizing.

Although I'll make some suggestions, the aim is not to change a great deal at this point. Rather, we will look at the main settings, see what they mean and what a change will actually do.


Debian Lenny - Nginx from source layout

Following from the main installing Nginx from source and creating an init script articles we can now move onto looking at the Nginx layout.

The idea of this article is to change the default layout to one more in keeping with the 'Debian' style. Installing Nginx via the package manager creates this layout automatically — we need to do it by hand.


Debian Lenny - adding an Nginx init script

If you decided to install Nginx via source (see the previous article) you would have the latest and greatest version.

However, one disadvantage of installing from source is that init scripts are not created. No problem - let's go ahead and create one for easy control of Nginx and to ensure that it restarts on a reboot.


Debian Lenny - Installing Nginx from source

Nginx is a popular lightweight server for those who do not need the bulk and extra services that Apache may offer.

This article will look at installing Nginx from source on a Debian Lenny Slice.


Debian Lenny - Installing Nginx via aptitude

Nginx is a popular lightweight server for those who do not need the bulk and extra services that Apache may offer.

This article will look at installing Nginx on a Debian Lenny Slice using the 'aptitude' package manager.


CentOS - Nginx, Rails, and Mongrels

Following from the mongrel and mongrel cluster article, we can now look at configuring Nginx to proxy to a mongrel cluster so we can serve our Ruby on Rails application.

The process is very easy and can simply be repeated for serving multiple domains.


CentOS - Nginx, Rails and Thin

Having installed the thin web server for Ruby, we can now look at configuring a Nginx vhost to proxy to thin so we can serve our Ruby on Rails application.

The process is easy to follow and easy to repeat for hosting multiple domains.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Nginx, rails and thin

Having installed the thin web server for Ruby, we can now look at configuring an Nginx vhost to proxy to thin so we can serve our Ruby on Rails application.

The process is easy to follow and easy to repeat for hosting multiple domains.


CentOS - Nginx virtual host settings

The previous CentOS Nginx Virtual Hosts article introduced the basics of the setting up virtual hosts.

This allowed us to serve multiple domains from a single IP address and Slice. Now we can look in detail at more of the settings available to us in the Virtual Hosts files.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Nginx, rails and mongrels

Following from the mongrel and mongrel cluster article, we can now look at configuring Nginx to proxy to a mongrel cluster so we can serve our Ruby on Rails application.

The process is very easy and can simply be repeated for serving multiple domains.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Nginx Virtual Hosts #2

The previous Ubuntu Intrepid Nginx Virtual Hosts article introduced the basics of the setting up virtual hosts.

This allowed us to serve multiple domains from a single IP address and slice. Now we can look in detail at more of the settings available to us in the Virtual Hosts files.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Nginx Virtual Hosts #1

Now we have Nginx installed (whether via the package manager or from source) we are in a position to serve multiple domains using Virtual Hosts.

Do note the layout used in this article is explained here — feel free to use the directories of your choice.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Nginx configuration

Whether you have installed Nginx using the package manager or from source, you will need to look at the main configuration file and see what may need changing and optimising.

Although I'll make some suggestions, the aim is not to change a great deal at this point. Rather, we will look at the main settings, see what they mean and what a change will actually do.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Nginx from source layout

Following from the main installing Nginx from source and creating an init script articles we can now move onto looking at the Nginx layout.

The idea of this article is to change the default layout to one more in keeping with the 'Debian' style. Installing Nginx via the package manager creates this layout automatically — we need to do it by hand.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Installing Nginx from source

Nginx is a popular lightweight server for those who do not need the bulk and extra services that Apache may offer.

This article will look at installing Nginx from source on an Ubuntu Intrepid Slice.


Ubuntu Intrepid - adding an Nginx init script

If you decided to install Nginx via source (see the previous article) you would have the latest and greatest version.

However, one disadvantage of installing from source is that init scripts are not created. No problem — let's go ahead and create one for easy control of Nginx, and to ensure it restarts on a reboot.


Ubuntu Intrepid - Installing Nginx via aptitude

Nginx is a popular lightweight server for those who do not need the bulk and extra services that Apache may offer.

This article will look at installing Nginx on an Ubuntu Intrepid Slice using the 'aptitude' package manager.


CentOS - Nginx Virtual Hosts

Now we have Nginx installed (whether via the package manager or from source) we are in a position to serve multiple domains using Virtual Hosts.

Do note the layout used in this article is explained here - feel free to use the directories of your choice.


CentOS - Nginx Configuration

Whether you have installed Nginx using the package manager or from source, you will need to look at the main configuration file and see what may need changing and optimizing.

Although I'll make some suggestions, the aim is not to change a great deal at this point. Rather, we will look at the main settings, see what they mean and what a change will actually do.


CentOS - Nginx from source layout

Following from the main installing Nginx from source and creating an init script articles we can now move onto looking at the Nginx layout.

The idea of this article is to change the default layout to one more in keeping with the 'CentOS' style. Installing Nginx via the package manager creates this layout automatically - we need to do it by hand.


CentOS - Adding an Nginx Init Script

If you decided to install Nginx via source (see the previous article) you would have the latest and greatest version.

However, one disadvantage of installing from source is that init scripts are not created. No problem, let's go ahead and create one for easy control of Nginx and to ensure it restarts on a reboot.


CentOS - Installing Nginx from source

Nginx is a popular lightweight server for those who do not need the bulk and extra services that Apache may offer.

This article will look at installing Nginx from source on a CentOS slice.


CentOS - Installing Nginx via yum

Nginx is a popular lightweight server for those who do not need the bulk and extra services that Apache may offer.

This article will look at installing Nginx on a CentOS Slice using the 'yum' package manager.


How to serve multiple domains

Most people serve more than one domain on their Slice(s).

Whether for different domain names or different subdomains of the same domain, the procedure is the same.


Ubuntu Hardy - Nginx, rails and thin

Having installed the thin web server for Ruby, we can now look at configuring a Nginx vhost to proxy to thin so we can serve our Ruby on Rails application.

The process is easy to follow and easy to repeat for hosting multiple domains.


Ubuntu Hardy - Nginx, rails and mongrels

Following from the mongrel and mongrel cluster article, we can now look at configuring Nginx to proxy to a mongrel cluster so we can serve our Ruby on Rails application.

The process is very easy and can simply be repeated for serving multiple domains.


Ubuntu Hardy - Nginx virtual host settings

The previous Ubuntu Hardy Nginx Virtual Hosts article introduced the basics of the setting up virtual hosts.

This allowed us to serve multiple domains from a single IP address and Slice. Now we can look in detail at more of the settings available to us in the Virtual Hosts files.


Ubuntu Hardy - Nginx Virtual Hosts

Now we have Nginx installed (whether via the package manager or from source) we are in a position to serve multiple domains using Virtual Hosts.

Do note the layout used in this article is explained here - feel free to use the directories of your choice.


Ubuntu Hardy - Nginx configuration

Whether you have installed Nginx using the package manager or from source, you will need to look at the main configuration file and see what may need changing and optimising.

Although I'll make some suggestions, the aim is not to change a great deal at this point. Rather, we will look at the main settings, see what they mean and what a change will actually do.


Ubuntu Hardy - Nginx from source layout

Following from the main installing Nginx from source and creating an init script articles we can now move onto looking at the Nginx layout.

The idea of this article is to change the default layout to one more in keeping with the 'Debian' style. Installing Nginx via the package manager creates this layout automatically - we need to do it by hand.


Ubuntu Hardy - adding an nginx init script

If you decided to install Nginx via source (see the previous article) you would have the latest and greatest version.

However, one disadvantage of installing from source is that init scripts are not created. No problem, let's go ahead and create one for easy control of Nginx and to ensure it restarts on a reboot.


Ubuntu Hardy - Installing Nginx from source

Nginx is a popular lightweight server for those who do not need the bulk and extra services that Apache may offer.

This article will look at installing Nginx from source on an Ubuntu Hardy Slice.


Ubuntu Hardy - Installing Nginx via aptitude

Nginx is a popular lightweight server for those who do not need the bulk and extra services that Apache may offer.

This article will look at installing Nginx on an Ubuntu Hardy Slice using the 'aptitude' package manager.


Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx vhosts, rails and mongrels

There are several ways of serving a Ruby on Rails application, one of which is to use Nginx to proxy requests to mongrels.

There are a few ways of completing this and we're going to look at one solution. Other methods, such as using a mongrel cluster will be looked at in future articles.


Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx, SSL and vhosts

So you've followed the Nginx self signed certificate article and now you want to configure Nginx to serve your site on the standard HTTPS port (443).

With Nginx, it is very easy to configure your virtual host to use a secure connection.


Ubuntu Gutsy - self signed SSL certificates and Nginx

Secure connections to your website are vital when entering passwords or entering administration areas.

This article will take you through generating a self-signed certificate to use with Nginx.


Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx Virtual Hosts #2

The previous Ubuntu Gutsy Nginx Virtual Hosts article introduced the basics of the setting up virtual hosts.

This allowed us to serve multiple domains from a single IP address and Slice. Now we can look in detail at some more settings available to us in the Virtual Hosts files.


Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx Virtual Hosts

Now we have Nginx installed and running, we can configure it to serve multiple domains using Virtual Hosts.

Do note the layout used in this article is explained here - feel free to use the directories of your choice.


Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx configuration #1

Let's take a look at the main nginx.conf file for our Ubuntu Gutsy install of Nginx.

Although I'll make some suggestions, the aim here is not to change a lot at this point. Rather, we will look at the main settings, see what they mean and what a change will actually do.


Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx config layout

Assuming you have followed this article and have installed Nginx via the Aptitude package manager, we can now have a look at what the install, um, installed.

If you have used Apache with a debian based layout, you will note some very nice similarities and consistencies.