Barebones postfix install overview

This article describes how to install a postfix mail server with no extras or optimization. It's intended only for users who are experienced administrators or who just want a basic mail server installed for a single purpose like sending email alerts from another service.


Barebones postfix install for Fedora

This article describes how to install a postfix mail server with no extras or optimization. It's intended only for users who are experienced administrators or who just want a basic mail server installed for a single purpose like sending email alerts from another service.


Barebones postfix install for RHEL

This article describes how to install a postfix mail server with no extras or optimization. It's intended only for users who are experienced administrators or who just want a basic mail server installed for a single purpose like sending email alerts from another service.


Barebones postfix install for Debian

This article describes how to install a postfix mail server with no extras or optimization. It's intended only for users who are experienced administrators or who just want a basic mail server installed for a single purpose like sending email alerts from another service.


Barebones postfix install for CentOS

This article describes how to install a postfix mail server with no extras or optimization. It's intended only for users who are experienced administrators or who just want a basic mail server installed for a single purpose like sending email alerts from another service.


Barebones postfix install for Ubuntu

This article describes how to install a postfix mail server with no extras or optimization. It's intended only for users who are experienced administrators or who just want a basic mail server installed for a single purpose like sending email alerts from another service.


Mail server - Configuring Postfix to use MySQL - part 2

Now we have created the external files Postfix will use when connecting to the 'mail' database (see the previous article for details), we can carry on and edit the main Postfix configuration file.


Mail server - secure connection, configuring Postfix

Now we've created our self-signed certificate (see the previous article) we can go ahead and configure Postfix to use it.


Mail server - Postfix and MySQL installation

Now we've configured the base Slice details and added the vmail user, we are ready to install Postfix and MySQL.

Remember, we will be using MySQL to control the domains and user details for our mail server.


Mail server - Configuring Postfix to use MySQL - part 1

Now the MySQL database has been created, we need to move into configuring Postfix to access and use the details.


Postfix - checking for an open relay

Open relays are a bad thing - they allow anyone to send email from your mail server: it doesn't check that it is authorised to send mail from the mail address on the third party email.

In plain English that means that anyone can send email via your Slice IP from any mail address. This tends to annoy people and your IP will end up on blocklists and your legitimate email will be banned.


Postfix - using Telnet to test postfix

So far, we have sent test emails using the command line.

However, there is no real feedback from these clients as to how our mail server responded - did it respond with the correct details? Note that it is possible to send/receive mail with details that are not 100% correct - leading to issues down the line.

Let's look at telnet to check the server responses to mail requests.


Postfix - MX records and receiving emails

So far, we have prepared the Slice, installed postfix and had a quick look at the postfix main.cf file.

From that solid base, we can send mail and we know it all works according to plan. Now we can move onto receiving emails. To do that, we need to create the correct MX records and open port 25 in our iptables firewall.


Postfix - basic settings in main.cf

Following from the postfix installation article, we can now look at the main.cf file and see what the settings are and what they mean.

Note that at this stage we are dealing with a single domain for our email needs. Later articles will look at multiple domains and virtual users.


Postfix - installation

The base package for all the mail articles will be postfix. There are, of course, alternatives to postfix, each with advantages and disadvantages and, without going into the differences, I have chosen postfix due its relative ease of configuration.

As many of the future articles will concentrate on administrative issues and assume postfix is already installed, let's go ahead and install it.