Configuring MySQL server on RHEL

We continue our MySQL server setup for CentOS by looking at configuration options to try and ensure the server doesn’t just run, but runs smoothly.


Installing MySQL Server on RHEL

We look at installing MySQL on RHEL and getting it running with a database and a user to access it.


Using NTP to sync time on RHEL

Keeping your RHEL system's date and time accurate is easy to do using NTP.


Using pv-grub to run custom kernels on RHEL - enabling and troubleshooting

Make the final changes to enable pv-grub for your RHEL VPS, then check the results.


Using pv-grub to run custom kernels on RHEL - preparing the slice

The pv-grub kernel option allows your RHEL slice to boot from your own kernel instead of one of ours. Before you can try it out you need to prepare the slice with some config changes.


Understanding logrotate on RHEL - part 2

In this second part of the logrotate series we look at how to set up rotation for virtual host logs, as well as some troubleshooting techniques.


Understanding logrotate on RHEL - part 1

It's no fun when log files grow out of control. In this two-part series, learn how to use logrotate to keep those logs in check.


Apache Virtual Hosts on RHEL - part 2

With the base apache virtual host configs in place on your RHEL server, let's look at other settings you may want to apply to them.


Apache Virtual Hosts on RHEL - part 1

Now that apache is running and configured on your RHEL server we can add virtual hosts to let it serve more than one domain.


Apache configuration on RHEL - part 2

We continue to look at apache configuration options for your RHEL server.


Apache configuration on RHEL - part 1

Your RHEL web server continues to take shape as we delve into the depths of apache's configuration options.


Configuring the Apache MPM on RHEL

Now that you know where the files are, let's look at how to tell apache to stay within the memory available to your RHEL server.


Apache configuration files on RHEL

Let's take a look at where apache's config files wind up when installed with the RHEL package manager.


Installing PHP on RHEL

Now that apache is running on your RHEL server you might want to add PHP support to it. Here's how.


Installing apache on RHEL

Installing the apache web server on an RHEL server is as simple using the "yum" package manager.


RHEL 5.4 Setup - part 2

Now that we've secured access to our RHEL 5.4 slice we can update it and get it ready for the rest of the server install.


RHEL 5.4 Setup - part 1

Your RHEL 5.4 Slice will be a bare-bones install when it's created. We need to connect via SSH and secure it as soon as possible.


RHEL 5.3 Setup - part 2

Now that we've secured access to our RHEL 5.3 slice we can update it and get it ready for the rest of the server install.


RHEL 5.3 Setup - part 1

Your RHEL 5.3 Slice will be a bare-bones install when it's created. We need to connect via SSH and secure it as soon as possible.


Enabling munin node plug-ins on RHEL

Munin uses plug-ins to determine what data is gathered and reported. It includes several plug-ins for the types of data most people would be interested in, but not all of those plug-ins are enabled on a fresh installation.


Installing additional munin nodes on RHEL

Following up on the article about installing a munin master slice, if you want to monitor additional slices you'll need to install a munin node service on each.


Enabling and using apache's mod_status on RHEL

Apache's mod_status module allows it to display a web page containing statistics about the web server's current state, including worker processes and active connections.


Munin configuration and testing on RHEL

This article continues the installation and setup of munin on a single slice. It explains how to determine or change the URL used to access munin's reports and then check to make sure those reports are viewable and being updated.


Installing munin on RHEL

Anticipating problems and resource shortages on a slice can be more valuable than fixing them after they've happened. A monitoring tool like munin lets you watch your slice's resource use over time. The graphs will highlight issues before they cause downtime or bandwidth quota overages.


Barebones postfix install for RHEL

This article describes how to install a postfix mail server with no extras or optimization. It's intended only for users who are experienced administrators or who just want a basic mail server installed for a single purpose like sending email alerts from another service.


Barebones apache install for RHEL

This article describes how to install an apache web server on Red Hat Enterprise Linux with no extras. It's intended only for users who are experienced administrators or who just want a basic web server install with no details on including modules like PHP or customizing apache for their site.


RHEL –Shorewall Basic Troubleshooting

So far, we've got Shorewall running smoothly and we've learned how to work with port access, both with macros that Shorewall has provided and with our own macros that we've made ourselves. Now it's time to learn what to do when things don't go according to plan. In this article, we'll take a look at Shorewall logging and how to interpret it to help troubleshoot problems.


RHEL – Shorewall Custom Macros

If you've been following along from the beginning, then you've gotten Shorewall installed, running, and have worked with some of the basic rules and macros. In this article, we'll get into what we have to do when we have to deal with ports that aren't included in the Shorewall defaults.


RHEL - Working with Shorewall Default Macros

The configuration of Shorewall continues. After reading this, you should have a better understanding of working with Shorewall's rules file and utilizing the default macros that Shorewall makes available to you.


RHEL - Shorewall Configuration

If you've gotten this far, you've should have successfully gotten Shorewall installed on your slice. Now we'll learn how to configure it, providing a powerful and simple mechanism for managing your slice's firewall.


RHEL - Shorewall installation

So you're ready to start installing applications on your slice and, rightly, you want to make sure that you're nice and secure. IPTables, right? Well, sure, but the only thing is that IPTables can be a messy beast to deal with. That's where Shorewall comes in.

Shorewall is the common name for the Shoreline firewall, a “wrapper” for IPTables that will handle all the heavy lifting for you. This article will get you started, showing you how to get Shorewall on your system.


RHEL Setup - Page 1

These Redhat articles will take you from a 'barebones' Redhat Enterprise Linux 5.3 Slice to a secured and up to date Slice ready for your server software (or whatever you use the Slice for).

Not only that, you will have a better understanding of what is going on and, more importantly, why it's going on.


RHEL Setup - Page 2

In page 1 of the Redhat setup, we finalized the configurations for ssh and iptables on our slice.

Let's move on and install some personal configuration files to make our life easier. Once done, we can update the install and create a solid base for the 'meat' of the server.