Managing SSL Certificates #1

SSL certificates can be confusing. The combination of unreadable file contents, fussy configuration requirements and critical expiry dates strew traps in the path of the beginner.

This how-to will help you avoid SSL's most common pitfalls.


Managing SSL Certificates #2

Verifying that SSL certificates match their date, domain and even their key file before making them live on a web-server will reduce site down-time. This article will explain how to do that.

We'll then finish up with the answer to a common problem: how to un-password protect an SSL certificate file so that your web server starts on boot without human intervention.


Mail server - secure connection, creating the SSL cert

The previous article looked at saslauthd. Now we need to concentrate on the certificate the connection will use when retrieving our mail.

This is completed using the same principles as when using a secure port (HTTPS) on a website. Let's start the process by creating a new SSL certificate.


Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx, SSL and vhosts

So you've followed the Nginx self signed certificate article and now you want to configure Nginx to serve your site on the standard HTTPS port (443).

With Nginx, it is very easy to configure your virtual host to use a secure connection.


Ubuntu Gutsy - self signed SSL certificates and Nginx

Secure connections to your website are vital when entering passwords or entering administration areas.

This article will take you through generating a self-signed certificate to use with Nginx.


Ubuntu Gutsy - Apache, SSL and vhosts

So you have a new SSL certificate (see here for self signed certs) and you want to configure Apache to serve your site on the standard HTTPS port (443).

No problem, it's easily done with a new Apache vhosts configuration file.


Ubuntu Gutsy - generating a self signed SSL certificate

Secure connections to your website are vital when entering passwords or entering administration areas.

This article will take you through generating a self-signed certificate to use with https (port 443) connections.


Ubuntu LTS - Apache, SSL and vhosts

Secure connections to your website are vital when entering passwords or entering administration areas.

This article will take you through creating a self-signed certificate and configuring your virtual host to use https (port 443) connections.


Ubuntu Feisty - Apache, SSL and vhosts

Secure connections to your website are vital when entering passwords or entering administration areas.

This article will take you through creating a self-signed certificate and configuring your virtual host to use https (port 443) connections.


Debian Etch - Apache, SSL and vhosts

Securing connections to your website are vital when entering passwords or entering administration areas.

This article will take you through creating a self-signed certificate and configuring your virtual host to use https (port 443) connections.