Ubuntu Gutsy Slices

Latest Article:

Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx vhosts, rails and mongrels

There are several ways of serving a Ruby on Rails application, one of which is to use Nginx to proxy requests to mongrels.

There are a few ways of completing this and we're going to look at one solution. Other methods, such as using a mongrel cluster will be looked at in future articles.

Setting up your Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) Slice is simple with these comprehensive articles. The Gutsy release is no longer supported by Ubuntu.

The Ubuntu Gutsy tutorials take you from a 'barebones' Slice to a secure, up to date and quick server in very little time.

Ubuntu Gutsy:

Ubuntu Gutsy setup - page 1: So you have your new, or reinstalled, Slice with Ubuntu Gutsy as the OS. Let's get on and secure it.

Ubuntu Gutsy setup - page 2: From the previous article, we now have a secured Slice. Let's move on and update the Slice and install some essentials.


Ruby on Rails:

Ubuntu Gutsy - MySQL and RoR: Our Ubuntu Gutsy Slice is now ready for a MySQL and Ruby on Rails stack with subversion and Postfix support.

Ubuntu Gutsy - Nginx, Rails and Mongrels: Using Nginx to proxy requests to mongrel server(s) is one of the ways of serving a Rails application.

Mongrel clusters and surviving a reboot: Following the previous article, we now look at creating mongrel clusters and ensuring they restart on a reboot.


Django:

Ubuntu Gutsy - Django Installation: Let's install our Gutsy Slice with a Django stack with our favourite database, subversion and Postfix support.


Misc:

Generating a self signed SSL certificate: Generating self signed SSL certificates for use on administration areas is very simple.


Generating a self signed SSL certificate for Nginx: Generating self signed SSL certificates for Nginx for use on administration areas.


Ubuntu Gutsy and Apache:

Apache and PHP install: Installing Apache 2.2 and PHP 5.2 on an Ubuntu Gutsy Slice is simple using aptitude. Let's go ahead and install the basics.

Apache Configuration Layout: Ubuntu Gutsy uses a 'Debian' style layout for the Apache install. Let's look at what that means.


Apache Configuration #1: Now we can take a look at the main Gutsy apache2.conf file and see what the settings mean and what effect they have.

Apache Configuration #2: Continuing from the first configuration article, this one looks at some further settings in the main apache2.conf file.


Apache Virtual Hosts #1: Now Apache is installed and running we can configure it to host multiple sites by creating virtual hosts.

Apache - Virtual Hosts #2: Continuing from the previous article, we now look in detail at the settings we can use in the vhosts file.

Apache - SSL and Virtual Hosts: How about securing the login area of an administration panel? No problem, let's configure a vhost for just that.


Apache, Rails and Mongrels: Using Apache to proxy requests to mongrel server(s) is one of the ways of serving a Rails application. Let's set that up.


Ubuntu Gutsy and Nginx:

Installing Nginx via aptitude: Using the package manager to install Nginx is very simple as it takes care of any dependencies and init scripts.


Generating a self signed SSL certificate for Nginx: Generating self signed SSL certificates for Nginx for use on administration areas.


Nginx install from source: Although Ubuntu Gutsy includes a recent version of Nginx, compiling from source will ensure we have the very latest one.

Add an Nginx init script: Installing Nginx from source does not create an init file. Let's rectify that so Nginx automatically starts on a reboot.


Nginx Configuration Layout: Installing Nginx via aptitude creates a 'Debian' style Apache layout. Let's look at what that means.


Nginx Configuration #1: Now we can take a look at the main Gutsy nginx.conf file and see what the settings mean and what effect they have.


Nginx Virtual Hosts #1: Now Nginx is installed and running we can configure it to host multiple sites by creating virtual hosts.

Nginx Virtual Hosts #2: Continuing from the previous article, we now look in detail at more settings in the vhosts file.

Nginx, SSL and Virtual Hosts: How about securing the login area of an administration panel? No problem, let's configure a vhost for just that.

Please feel free to request articles or comment with any suggestions or ideas of your own.

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